Welcome to my Montessori and homeschool-friendly blog!



Welcome to my Montessori and homeschool-friendly blog where I offer advice, tips, lessons, activities, and affordable resources for parents and educators of infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary-age children. I'm Lisa Nolan and I was inspired by my young son to start this blog--and the many e-mail questions I got from other Montessori and homeschool moms and educators who needed help, tips, advice, or just some encouragement!  Read more about me here!

Follow me on Facebook here; I'm on Pinterest, too. You can also check out my anthologies for moms at Monkey Star Press!


Do You Need to Be Crafty to do Montessori?

Do You Need to Be Crafty to do Montessori? {Confessions of a Montessori Mom}

I am a mom with well intentions, but I struggle with organization, planning and as a pregnant woman, fatigue! I am also admittedly not that crafty. I will often opt to purchase an item if it will save me from the overwhelming feeling of crafting something. However, I really don't want my deficiencies to interfere with the type of quality environment I raise my children in.  After reading many different Montessori books, I know this is the approach that I want to adopt for raising both my children.

I asked other Montessori moms and educators what they thought! Here is what they had to say:
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Is there a general order that teachers use for giving Montessori lessons?

Is there a general order that teachers use for giving Montessori lessons? {Confessions of a Montessori Mom}

Is there a general order that teachers use for giving lessons? Montessori method follows the child and observes what is next for that child. Therefore, I have read in many places that there is no set curriculum to follow. But there are albums that Montessori teachers create. There may be no set time to teach something, but what I am thinking and wondering is, is there a general order or pattern which a teacher might use. I have noticed in the math materials that the pink tower comes before the brown stair and the red rods. I am thinking that I could have the "next" lessons or activities prepared, and tucked away, and taken out when the child is ready for it. But how do I know what lessons and activities to tuck away?--Laura S.

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Photo credit: abbamouse / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

What constitutes misuse of materials by an infant?

What constitutes misuse of materials by an infant? {Confessions of a Montessori Mom}


I've been doing a few Montessori activities with my son C. since he was born. He's now nine and a half months old. Here's a question I've been wondering about for a while.

When I present an activity, C. has very little interest in copying me and doing the intended activity. I know that sometimes it's appropriate for the child to use the materials in his own way, but other times it indicates that he is not ready for the activity and I should just put it away. But how do I tell the difference?

When I presented the "putting spoons in a bowl" activity, C. picked up the spoons and put them in his mouth, and tapped them together, both of which I thought were probably ok. But then he took a spoon in each hand and started crawling away (he loves to crawl while holding things). I decided that was not a good idea, because he wasn't using the materials in any investigative way, so I took the spoons away from him and he was really mad.

Do you have any tips on this for the infant stage?

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Photo credit: Scott SM / Foter / CC BY-NC

Are Montessori Young Kids on Average More Shy?

Are Montessori Young Kids on Average More Shy?

Hi, I am a mom from Macau. I am often faced with the comment from non-Montessori outsiders, or even families who send their kids to Montessori preschools, claiming "Montessori young kids on average are more shy, or need more time to warm up in social gatherings, than kids who go to playgroups". Is this the real scenario? My 2 yr 8 mo girl happens to be an introvert, and people are commenting like "is the Montessori environment really helping her to survive in an extrovert world". I firmly believe in Montessori philosophy, but have to admit I am anxious in this area, especially as she is approaching the time for school interviews for getting selected and admissions into kindergarten, and she really needs a long time to feel comfortable before she speaks or greets (we don't have Montessori kindergartens or elementary schools here in my place). Can you give me more insights to this? Thank you so much!