Skip to main content
"A great blog that is fun, interesting and informative. Packed full of information on a range of topics. I love their sense of humor while they are providing well informed and thought out answers to your questions. All in all a great read for any parent!"--Christine Howard.


Proud affiliate of Montessori Services!

Montessori and Baby Sign Language Question

If Dr. Maria Montessori were alive, would she suggest baby sign language?

I used to ask myself that question a lot! I do not think she would be against it since she worked with handicapped and special needs children early on in her career. But I don’t think she would have included it into her infant toddler curriculum, either—just a hunch.

I was opposed to it for my son, who has Down syndrome, until I watched a DVD for parents of young children with Down syndrome. And it had to do with auditory skills.

For example, if I were to say to my son, “juice,” he might hear “juh” or “u” or “s” but not “juice.” Now, let’s say I hold up a cup of his juice and I sign “juice,” he would understand me by seeing the sign and the juice, but he probably would not hear the word correctly. (It later turned out my son had hearing loss.)

So now you sign to him “juice,” and he has a mental picture of “juice” and can sign it back.

After I watched this DVD and they talked about sign language, and how I understood it for my son, I was convinced it was the right choice for my son. However, he did not show an interest in baby signs (and sign language) until age 2½.

I do not think you can harm your baby’s language development by using sign language.

If you want to teach signs, use the concrete object as much as possible (I think Maria Montessori would agree with that).

To read other Montessori opinions on sign language and baby signs,try these Montessori blogs:

Daily Montessori: Baby Sign Language
Our Montessori Homeschool: Sign Language (Baby Signs)
YouTube video clip from Patience Montessori

We used the Signing Time DVD series to teach our son sign language, he loved each and every one! He learned over 50 signs (I lost count after a while) including the signs for the letters of the alphabet! I LOVED these DVDs, too, because they taught me sign language as well!

You can also watch YouTube sign language video clips to learn all the different signs. And visit this Baby Signing Mummy blog!

END

Will work for COMMENTS! Leave me a comment or ask me a question here!
My Montessori online program for infants and tots is here.
My recommended reading for Montessori and infant development is here.
My other blog posts on infants are here.

Popular posts from this blog

Montessori Printables & PDFs

Montessori printables,downloads, and PDFs are an inexpensive to make your own, DIY materials for your homeschool or day care setting! Well I have some terrific resources to share with you from the Montessori mom bloggers of the Montessori Bloggers Network. Want to PIN for later?

Montessori Language & Outline for Ages 3 to 9

I am sharing my Montessori training lecture notes on language, an introduction and outline, for ages three to nine. The most important concept in early language development is that the child has to become aware that language and words are made of sounds. We achieve this with the help of the I Spy Game. The next step is to introduce the symbols that represent these sounds with the help of the Sandpaper Letters.

A Montessori Infant and Toddler Home Environment

I get a lot of questions about how to do Montessori at home with infants and their toddler siblings. So I created a Montessori Infant and Sibling Series. This is part one.
Questions
"How do I organize the work room areas (where all the Montessori-related materials are going to be) including a two-year-old area (such as art section, math section, etc.) and an 11-month-old area of the room?"
"What about their bedrooms and the living room? Which room should I start with first? It's just overwhelming."
"Should I make up a daily schedule first, or organize (plan, shop, and display) all the materials first? And how do I decide what I should put on the shelves for each of my children?"
Want to PIN for later?

Best Montessori Books I Own

Welcome to my Best Montessori Books I Own Series: I highlight four Montessori books including Teach Me to do it Myself, Montessori activities for you and your child  by Maja Pitamic; How to Raise an Amazing Child The Montessori Way by Tim Seldin; The Essential Montessori Updated Edition: an Introduction to the Woman, the Writings, the Method, and the Movement  by Elizabeth Hainstock; and Awakening Your Toddler's Love of Learning by Jan Katzen-Luchenta. Some of these books are available at your local library, as an ebook on Kindle, and or used and new on Amazon.com where you can add them to your wish list or purchase them on the spot. Want to PIN for later?

How many Montessori materials do you REALLY need in the home?

A Montessori mom recently confessed in my Montessori Facebook group about the constant feeling of needing MORE: more Montessori activities and materials, more quality toys, more art supplies... When do you feel satisfied? When do you have enough!?
CLICK to subscribe for my 37-page Montessori FAQs PDF