Learning to Write Your Name







A child's first introduction to writing letters often starts with the child's name. If your child is showing an interest in writing letters, try this lesson on learning how to write your name!

Indirect Aim: Writing.

Direct Aim: To make the child aware that sounds have symbols.

Age: 4 to 5

Materials: Sandpaper letters, pencil, paper.

Example of child's name: Sarah

1. "Today we are going to write your name!" (Or you can just write the first letter of the child's name: "Today we are going to write the first letter in your name!") "What is the first letter in your name?" If the child gives the name for the letter 's' (es) you say, "Its name is 's' (es) but it says the sound ‘sss’ like snake; do we call you es-sarah? or sss-sarah; do we call a snake an es-nake or a sss-nake?"

Want to PIN for later?
If the child has a blend, like 'ch' for Charlie, say "The letters 'C' (see) and 'h' (ay-chu) make the sound 'ch' like chair! Do we call it a 'see ay-chu air'? No, we call it a chair."

2. Take any kind of paper (or chalkboard) and a normal size pencil (or white chalk), and start with first letter in child’s name. Use a capital letter! Trace the capital letter 'S' with two fingers (use pointing finger and middle finger and always top to bottom, left to write) then write it. Do a whole line of the letter 'S', if the child can wait! Or, at some point, ask the child to have a turn to trace the letter 'S' and write it. Trace it first, then write it, trace it again, then write it again, repeat this pattern of tracing and writing, tracing and writing.

Later, another day, use mathematics paper (squared paper) and try to get the child to write the letter 'S' into the squares. Try to get her to write a whole line (ten squares per line is OK).

3. "Now we are going to write the second letter in your name!" (Or you can write the second letter another day.) "The second letter in your name is -------" (for our example, Sarah, it would be 'a').

4. Use a lower case letter 'a'! Trace the lower case letter 'a' with two fingers (use pointing finger and middle finger and always top to bottom, left to write) then write it. Do a whole line of the letter 'a', if the child can wait! Or, at some point, ask the child to have a turn to trace the letter 'a' and write it. Trace it first, then write it, trace it again, then write it again, repeat this pattern of tracing and writing, tracing and writing.

Later, another day, use mathematics paper (squared paper) and try to get the child to write the letter into the squares. Try to get her to write a whole line (ten squares per line is OK).

Continue with the next letter in the child's name, or wait until another day.

You can also have the child's name witten out on a piece of paper or cardstock, and place it near the pencils and paper for her to go and get when ever she wants to write her name. Later, she will want to write her sibling's or her friend's name, have that child's name witten out on a piece of paper or cardstock, and place it near the pencils and paper for her to go and get when ever she wants to write it.

Optional: You can use dots to write the letter(s) and have the child trace over the dots.

Markers: allow the child to decorate her paper with markers after she has practiced writing her name in pencil HOWEVER, for children who have difficultly writing (they are hard to motivate) allow them to use markers to practice writing their name, just remind them what happens if they make a mistake--they cannot erase it, instead they can cross it out, or try again (using the same paper!).

Encourage the child to always write her name on her artwork!

END Want to PIN for later?


You might also be interested in Montessori Read & Write on Amazon.com.
I also recommend the following Montessori books for language and reading:
Teaching Montessori in the Home: The Pre-school Years by Elizabeth G. Hainstock
Teaching Montessori in the Home: The School Years by E. G. Hainstock
Follow Lisa Nolan's board Confessions of a Montessori Mom on Pinterest.




CLICK to subscribe for my 37-page Montessori FAQs PDF